It should be noted that some health facilities, such as medical and environmental laboratories, are small projects and may not require a full EIA. However, regulatory authorities should develop a module to monitor their waste management in order to avoid pollution. The situation is slightly different in industrialized countries, where there is an integrated health management system; Medical laboratories are usually part of large healthcare facilities. It is worth noting categorically that laboratory waste is one of the most contagious groups of health waste. They contain live virulant pathogens and mutagenic and teratogenic chemicals, including dyes. Laboratories must be required to have a standard protocol for monitoring waste, in accordance with the international convention called the polluter pays principle (PPP). The environmental impact of poor management of medical waste is as follows: genotoxic waste: highly hazardous, mutagenic, teratogenic or carcinogenic waste, such as cytotoxic drugs used in the treatment of cancer and their metabolites; Genotoxic waste comes from drugs typically used in oncology or radiotherapy devices and have a very dangerous mutagenic or cytotoxic effect. Stool, vomiting or urine of patients treated with cytostatics or chemicals should be considered genotoxic. In cancer hospitals, their proper treatment or disposal poses serious safety concerns. In most cases, the lack of environmental impact assessments prior to the launch of projects in the field of public health and the pharmaceutical industry is responsible for archiving the challenges of waste management in developing countries, including Nigeria. . .

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